Indian Wedding Vase Ceremony

Indian Wedding Vase Ceremony  

Meaning

The meaning of an Indian Wedding Vase ceremony is similar to that of a unity candle or a cup. During your ceremony each of you drink from the vessel as a symbol of two individuals whose lives are becoming one.

History

Wedding vases are traditionally used by Native Americans in the Southwest but are increasingly being used by couples drawn to the Native American spirituality and its reverence for nature, the earth, and the environment.

Choosing Your Vase

There are  Native American artisans to that make authentic Indian Wedding Vases using traditional materials and methods.

Ceremony

The Native American vase is designed with two spouts, symbolizing your individuality. For your ceremony the vase is filled with pure water, herb tea or wine. The bride drinks first then hands it to the groom, symbolizing the sharing of one life, one love. During the ceremony your officiant should explain the significance of the ritual, and may recite reading, poem or blessing.

After the Wedding

Native American families consider the vase a sacred treasure to display in their home and pass from one generation to the next.

Sample Ceremony

[Name] and [Name], as you share this one wine from two spouts, so may each of you share contentment, comfort and happiness from the common cup of your marriage.

May you find life’s joys great, its bitterness sweetened and all things enriched by your companionship and love.

A prayer such as the Native American Wedding Prayer or other suitable reading may be added at this and is actually something that is used quite often in several wedding ceremonies.

 

Native American Wedding Prayer

American Indians have a rich history of spirituality and you may be pleasantly surprised by the intensity and meaning these age-old prayers can bring to your wedding ceremony.

The blessing works nicely as a reading to be recited by your officiant, friend or family member, and it is especially meaningful when accompanied by the Wedding Vase Ceremony.

This traditional wedding blessing is said to have come from the Apache Indians and there are several versions, we like these two in particular.

 

First Version

Now you feel no rain
for each of you will be shelter to the other.
Now you will feel no cold
for each of you will be warmth to the other.

Now there will be no loneliness for you.

Now you are two persons,
but there is only one life before you.
Go now to your dwelling place,
to enter into the days of your togetherness.

And may your days be good and long together.

Second Version

Now you will feel no rain, for each of you will be the shelter for each other. Now you will feel no cold, for each of you will be the warmth for the other. Now you are two persons, but there is only one life before.

Go now to your dwelling place to enter into the days of your life together. And may your days be good and long upon the earth. Treat yourselves and each other with respect, and remind yourselves often of what brought you together.

Give the highest priority to the tenderness, gentleness and kindness that your connection deserves. When frustration, difficulty and fear assail your relationship – as they threaten all relationships at one time or another – remember to focus on what is right between you, not only the part which seems wrong. In this way, you can ride out the storms when clouds hide the face of the sun in your lives – remembering that even if you lose sight of it for a moment, the sun is still there.

And if each of you takes responsibility for the quality of your life together, it will be marked by abundance and delight.